Resources for 2d game physics


Question

I'm looking for some good references for learning how to model 2d physics in games. I am not looking for a library to do it for me - I want to think and learn, not blindly use someone else's work.

I've done a good bit of Googling, and while I've found a few tutorials on GameDev, etc., I find their tutorials hard to understand because they are either written poorly, or assume a level of mathematical understanding that I don't yet possess.

For specifics - I'm looking for how to model a top-down 2d game, sort of like a tank combat game - and I want to accurately model (among other things) acceleration and speed, heat buildup of 'components,' collisions between models and level boundaries, and missile-type weapons.

Websites, recommended books, blogs, code examples - all are welcome if they will aid understanding. I'm considering using C# and F# to build my game, so code examples in either of those languages would be great - but don't let language stop you from posting a good link. =)

Edit: I don't mean that I don't understand math - it's more the case that I don't know what I need to know in order to understand the systems involved, and don't really know how to find the resources that will teach me in an understandable way.

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10/3/2008 2:41:00 AM

Accepted Answer

Here are some resources I assembled a few years ago. Of note is the Verlet Integration. I am also including links to some open source and commercial physics engines I found at that time. There is a stackoverflow article on this subject here: 2d game physics?

Physics Methods

Books

  • "Game Physics Engine Development", Ian Millington -- I own this book and highly recommend it. The book builds a physics engine in C++ from scratch. The Author starts with basic particle physics and then adds "laws of motion", constraints, rigid-body physics and on and on. He includes well documented source code all the way through.

Physics Engines

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5/23/2017 11:54:25 AM


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